Sunday, July 23, 2017
Tuesday, 24 March 2015 06:52

Does Your Home Need a Dehumidifier?

During a typical New York summer the air can be hot and muggy outside, which can mean excess moisture inside. Excessive indoor humidity is not just uncomfortable, it can lead to unhealthy mold, musty odors and condensation that can damage wood surfaces and paint.

In today's tight, well insulated homes, excess moisture can make your air conditioner work harder to keep the air cool and dry. To help keep the air dryer, a dehumidifier can be an effective solution.

How does a dehumidifier work?
As warm, humid air is blown across a cold coil by a fan, moisture condenses into liquid, which can be removed through a drain pipe. The dry air then passes over a warm coil and is added back into the room. Dehumidifiers are controlled by an instrument called a dehumidistat, which turns the unit on and off depending on the amount of moisture detected in the air. The level of moisture is controlled by a dehumidistat, which turns the unit on and off. A dehumidifier's capacity is measured in pints of water removed every 24 hours.

Carrier Whole Home Dehumidifers
A whole house dehumidifier is designed to work in conjunction with your home's heating and air conditioning system by monitoring and controlling the level of humidity. It operates quietly and is easily maintained by cleaning a filter.

Have questions about controlling excess humidity in your home? Call Maxwell Plumb, we're here to help.
Published in Maxwell Plumb Blog
Wednesday, 28 January 2015 14:36

3 Ways To Improve Indoor Air Quality

Indoor air quality is dependent on many factors, but there are three important steps that you can take to keep the air healthier, safer and more comfortable inside the home.

Air Filtration

One of the most important steps you can take to keep the air clean is to change your furnace air filter on a regularly. For most 1" pleated filters, that means replacing the filter once per month to keep the air clean and the furnace operating efficiently. If there are pets or allergy sufferers in the home, consider a whole house HEPA air filtration system to reduce pet dander and allergens.

Maintain Proper Humidity Levels

During the summer, a central air conditioner will do a good job of removing moisture from the air. In extremely humidity environments, excess mold can form, leading to health problems. If the humidity is over 50% you'll likely be feeling uncomfortable and may benefit from a whole house dehumidifier.

In the winter, humidity levels between 30-40% are ideal. If humidity levels are too low, you may experience dry, cracked skin and a upper respiratory irritation. A whole house humidifier is a better option than standalone units, which are less effective and can harbor mold and bacteria.

Exhaust Systems

Many of the most harmful contaminants in the home are unseen. Carbon monoxide and radon are colorless, odorless gases that can cause serious health problems or death. Gas furnaces, water heaters, dryers and other appliances that produce carbon monoxide exhaust must be properly vented to the outside of the home.
Have your home tested for Radon. If your home tests high for radon gas, special exhaust systems can be installed to improve ventilation to reduce exposure.

Have questions about indoor air quality? Give Maxwell Plumb call, we're here to help.
Published in Maxwell Plumb Blog
Tuesday, 08 July 2014 20:54

The Complete Indoor Air Quality System

While a furnace air cleaner does a good job of trapping the larger particles in the air, its primary function is to keep the inside of the furnace free of damaging dirt and debris. For truly clean and healthy indoor air there are additional parts to the indoor air quality system. These include:

Electronic Air Cleaners

Electronic air cleaners work by charging the particles and killing pathogens like bacteria, viruses and mold. By continuously filtering out pollutants, allergens and pathogens in your home, you'll have cleaner, healthier air.

Humidifiers

When the air inside your home is too dry you may experience dry, chapped skin, upper respiratory irritation and increased allergies from dust and airborne particles.

A steam output humidifier is a good choice for larger homes or when you want more precise control over humidity. The humidifier flows water between electrodes to create steam which is then dispersed into the ductwork. This design uses an easy to replace canister system and can be managed by your system's thermostat.

UV Lamps

Germicidal UV lamps use ultra violet light to kill mold and bacteria. They kill the organisms that can grow on the indoor coil of your cooling system. Eliminating these germs will not only improve your air quality, it will increase HVAC system performance as well.

Ventilators

During the hot, sticky summer months, ventilators quietly replace stale indoor air with fresh outside air using the outgoing air to precondition incoming air, which helps keep your system efficient. Using specially designed, treated paper cores, they are also able to reduce humidity from the air before it enters your home.

Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, tasteless, odorless and highly toxic gas. A CO alarm uses sophisticated sensor technology to detect and record levels of CO.

You can monitor the current CO level in your home on a large, easy-to-read digital display. When dangerous levels of CO are present, a loud, audible alarm alerts you automatically.


Published in Maxwell Plumb Blog
Saturday, 17 August 2013 20:41

Is Your HVAC System Harboring Mold?

Mold is commonly found in varying amounts in building HVAC systems. When mold grows unattended it can decrease air quality and lead to health issues in the building. Therefore it's important to learn about typical sources of air conditioner mold and learn how to remove mold before it reaches harmful levels.

Air conditioning systems are especially prone to mold in area such as the drain pan, which holds standing water for long periods of time. Pipes with bends and curves may also hold water in suspension, leading to mold growth. Sometimes when  mold growing inside the unit you can also see it growing on the inside of the air ducts.

While mold may be visible around the air conditioner and ventilation system, removing the mold is not as simple as cleaning the surfaces where mold is visible, you need to find the source of the problem to prevent mold from recurring.

Sometimes the source of excessive moisture that causes mold is from water leaks and defects in the unit. Maxwell Plumb's HVAC technicians can locate the cause of the excess moisture and recommend solutions.

Preventing Mold In Your Air Conditioner

To avoid dealing with mold issues in the future, examine your condenser drain regularly for clogs. If this drain gets backed up, the standing water can develop bacteria, which in turn can lead to mold. Once you’ve removed the mold from the system, you’ll need to make sure it doesn’t return by regularly maintaining the unit to keep the ducts clean.

Having your air ducts cleaned regularly can help to remove visible mold growing in the air ducts. If you can see mold in these places, there may be mold accumulating in other parts of the building. If the mold problem is severe enough, you’ll need to contact a mold specialist. Make sure that the professional who cleans your system uses a cleaning treatment that does not contain harmful chemicals that may adversely affect your indoor air quality.


Published in Maxwell Plumb Blog
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Maxwell Plumb Blog

  • Maxwell Plumb Does Your Home Need a Dehumidifier? Written by Maxwell Plumb

    During a typical New York summer the air can be hot and muggy outside, which can mean excess moisture inside. Excessive indoor humidity is not just uncomfortable, it can lead to unhealthy mold, musty odors and condensation that can damage wood surfaces and paint.

    In today's tight, well insulated homes, excess moisture can make your air conditioner work harder to keep the air cool and dry. To help keep the air dryer, a dehumidifier can be an effective solution.

    How does a dehumidifier work?
    As warm, humid air is blown across a cold coil by a fan, moisture condenses into liquid, which can be removed through a drain pipe. The dry air then passes over a warm coil and is added back into the room. Dehumidifiers are controlled by an instrument called a dehumidistat, which turns the unit on and off depending on the amount of moisture detected in the air. The level of moisture is controlled by a dehumidistat, which turns the unit on and off. A dehumidifier's capacity is measured in pints of water removed every 24 hours.

    Carrier Whole Home Dehumidifers
    A whole house dehumidifier is designed to work in conjunction with your home's heating and air conditioning system by monitoring and controlling the level of humidity. It operates quietly and is easily maintained by cleaning a filter.

    Have questions about controlling excess humidity in your home? Call Maxwell Plumb, we're here to help.





    Written on Tuesday, 24 March 2015 06:52 in Maxwell Plumb Blog
    Tags: indoor air quality dehumidifier humidity Be the first to comment! Read 2424 times Read more...
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